CALIFORNIA DREAM

This story is part of The California Dream project, a statewide nonprofit media collaboration focused on issues of economic opportunity, quality-of-life, and the future of the California Dream. Partner organizations include CALmatters, Capital Public Radio, KPBS, KPCC, and KQED with support provided by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the James Irvine Foundation. Share your California dream. On Twitter, use the hashtag #CADream.


With the June primary approaching, there is a fight underway for the identity of the California Republican Party.

A scoop of horchata or matcha green tea would have been all but impossible to find in decades past. Now, they're part of the evolving dream for some California businesses…

Chad Bordes is 46 and has an MBA. But between high rents and student loan debt, he's struggling.

California went big on freeways during the postwar years, but the days of easy driving and the lifestyle it enabled didn't last long.

The flow of migrants from Mexico has slowed dramatically in recent years, but many immigrants see farm work as a stepping stone to a better life.

Thousands of qualified college hopefuls will be rejected from a UC or CSU — and may never come back to California.

The current debate over the state's immigration policies recalls the bitter battles fought two decades ago, over Proposition 187.

The California Gold Rush redefined how Americans saw failure and success. Today, the state’s economy still benefits from entrepreneurs eager to take big chances.

California’s $2.75 trillion economy makes it the world’s sixth largest. But that ranking disguises an economic fault-line: The decline of the middle class.

Immigration and the Latino vote swayed the state away from GOP support toward the liberal Democratic Party agenda.

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