Resistance State: California in the Age of Trump

Between Sacramento and Washington D.C. sits the rest of the country, and a chasm. On immigration and taxes, guns and healthcare, cannabis and climate change, California is the federal government’s equal and opposite reaction. One year into President Trump’s first term, the push and pull continues—playing out under the Capitol dome, in the courts and on Twitter.

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Resistance State

Jan. 26, 2018 5:36 pm

Trump administration backs Berkeley College Republicans in free speech suit

Protesters crowd Sproul Plaza on the UC Berkeley campus this fall. Photo by Pax Ahimsa Gethen via Wikimedia Commons
Protesters crowd Sproul Plaza on the UC Berkeley campus last fall. Photo by Pax Ahimsa Gethen via Wikimedia Commons
Education

After months of controversy over far-right speakers on the UC Berkeley campus, the US Department of Justice has weighed in. Attorneys for the department filed a brief Thursday in support of a federal lawsuit by the Berkeley College Republicans and the Young America’s Foundation alleging that the university’s public event policies discriminate against conservatives.

The brief cites a “grave concern” that “free speech has come under attack on campuses across the country.” It echoes criticisms of Berkeley made by Attorney General Jeff Sessions in a speech at Georgetown University last fall, in which he charged the university was coddling students and cracking down on speech.

Planned campus appearances by conservative firebrands Milo Yiannopoulos and Ann Coulter sparked protests last year and ultimately were canceled due to security concerns.

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The events’ sponsors have pointed out the irony of speakers being shouted down in the birthplace of the Free Speech Movement. But other students critique what they say is a deliberate strategy by conservative groups of booking racist, sexist and homophobic “experts” to provoke students, then crying foul when they are opposed.

UC Berkeley quickly fired back with a statement noting that the suit had already been dismissed by a judge once. (The students submitted an amended complaint, which the university is arguing should be thrown out.) “Berkeley does not discriminate against speakers invited by student organizations based upon viewpoint,” the statement reads. “The campus is committed to ensuring that student groups may hold events with speakers of their choosing, and it has expended significant resources to allow events to go forward without compromising the safety or security of the campus…The campus will continue to vigorously defend itself against these allegations.”

While the Justice Department did not take a position on whether the right-wing groups would prevail in a trial, it argued that the case should go forward.

Higher Education Reporter
donald trump

Feb. 22, 2018 2:33 pm

Trump says he may pull immigration agents out of California

Immigration

In a meeting about school safety and guns, President Donald Trump pivoted to some favorite targets: California and immigration. He said he might remove immigration and border officers from the Golden State and predicted that the result would be “a crime mess like you’ve never seen,” CNN and other news outlets reported today.

He mentioned gangs as a problem that the federal government was trying to address, with “no help from the state of California,” where one foreign gang establishes “franchises.”

“They’re doing a lousy management job, they have the highest taxes in the nation and they don’t know what’s happening out there,” Trump said.

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Trump made his remarks in a session with state and local officials who had dealt with shootings at schools. He did not explain how he believed gangs and school shootings were related.

He went on to say, “the sanctuary city situation, the protection of these horrible criminals …. If we ever pulled our ICE out and said, ‘Hey, let California alone and let them figure it out themselves,’ in two months they’d be begging for us to come back.”

“I’m thinking about doing it,” he said, without offering details about a specific plan.

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, who has filed more than two dozen lawsuits against the Trump administration on a range of issues, said the state works “in concert with federal laws” and defended its pursuit of those who commit crimes.

“We’re going after drug dealers, sex traffickers. We don’t stop doing that. My division of law enforcement is doing that right now,” Becerra said in a statement. “What we won’t do is change from being focused in public safety – we’re in the business of public safety, not deportation.” 

As recently as January, the acting director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Thomas Homan, said California should prepare for an onslaught of ICE actions, such as raids and business audits. That statement came days after California’s “sanctuary state” law went into effect, limiting state and local law enforcers’ cooperation with federal authorities in certain circumstances.

Health and Welfare Reporter
Resistance State

Feb. 8, 2018 2:02 pm

Californians rally against Trump’s offshore oil drilling proposal

Environment

Protestors wearing dolphin, shark and polar bear costumes joined the throngs who descended on Sacramento Thursday to speak out against the Trump administration’s proposal to expand oil drilling in federal waters off the California coast.

After a rally outside the state Capitol they marched to a library a few blocks away where the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management hosted the sole public meeting on the proposal in California. The agency is holding one meeting in each coastal state.

The format frustrated some attendees. Instead of the typical government hearing where long lines of people wait to comment at a microphone, visitors were directed to mill about a large room where federal employees were stationed at about a dozen tables. They explained different aspects of the national offshore drilling program—how leases are approved, how much money it brings to the U.S. economy, how the government responds to and tries to prevent oil spills—and answered questions from the public. A table with computers and comment cards was available for visitors to formally submit comments to the government.

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But environmentalists—many wearing blue shirts saying “Californians against offshore drilling”—had traveled from around the state to attend the meeting and craved an opportunity to sound off.

“That one table? For hundreds of people?” Sharolyn Hutton of Eureka said, looking at the computer table set up for public comment.

At one point a few protestors began shouting in the middle of the room, “This is ridiculous! This is shameful!”

John Romero, spokesman for the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, said the format was meant to provide more meaningful dialogue between the public and the government.

A representative from the Western States Petroleum Association stopped by the meeting. He noted that Californians use almost 2 million barrels of oil each day. “We want to make sure folks understand our enormous energy consumption here,” said Bob Poole, the associations director of production.

The oil association president, Catherine Reheis-Boyd, issued a statement saying that the exploration of potential drilling sites in federal water “is the first step in helping California increase our energy security through potentially increasing our domestic energy production. Currently, we import over 1 million barrels of oil in super tankers from overseas locations each and every day.”

California’s elected officials have already made clear that they oppose more drilling off the coast and will try to block it by making it difficult to transport oil through state waters, which extend three miles off the coast. With bipartisan support the Assembly passed a resolution Thursday criticizing the Trump Administration plan and the State Lands Commission, which oversees oil drilling in state waters, sent the federal government a letter this week saying it is “vehemently opposed” to more oil and gas drilling in the Pacific ocean.

Political Reporter
Resistance State

Feb. 6, 2018 1:31 pm

California sues Trump administration over water protection

Protection of some California waters is being stalled by the Trump administration, a new lawsuit says. Image by the Bureau of Land Management via FLICKR
Environment

California has joined a group of states suing two federal agencies for suspending a 2015 rule that extended the definition of streams and wetlands entitled to protection under the Clean Water Act.

The “waters of the United States” rule was adopted in 2015 to better define which bodies of water are covered under federal law, both for protection against development and depletions and as a bulwark against pollution.

Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced today that he sued the Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, bringing the number of suits filed by California against the Trump Administration to more than two dozen.

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“The California Department of Justice will not spectate as this administration attempts to undo yet another critical environmental protection,” Becerra said in a statement. “We will do what is necessary to defend the Clean Water Rule and our right to clean water. The Rule was legally promulgated, based on science, and will help protect our precious water resources.”

The Obama-era regulation was intended to apply rigorous science to more clearly spell out which waterways were protected and to put an end to a free-for-all in which states applied differing interpretations. The new definitions included floodplains and streams that do not flow year-round.

Those rules were strenuously opposed by developers, who said they swept up much of the undeveloped land in California.

In addition to the lawsuit brought by attorneys general from 11 states, the suspension of the 2015 regulation has been challenged by a host of environmental organizations.

Environment Reporter

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