Housing legislation

I read “California’s hottest housing bill moves ahead—with a break for smaller counties” while sitting in a café in Athens, Greece. I was struck by the irony of being in the birthplace of democracy while Sacramento legislators deliver death by a thousand cuts.

Senate Bill 50 marches ahead under Sen. Scott Wiener’s crusader banner of a housing crisis. Now Sen, Mike McGuire, rather than standing up for the rights of every community to plan, joins the crusader mentality and carves out special privilege for his kingdom.

Housing legislation, rather than serving the greatest good, caters to special interests. It tramples on the wisdom of community planning based on unique circumstances. It fuels ambitious politicians and denies the fundamental strength of locally elected officials.

As earthquake and erosion destroyed Athens, the housing bills of Wiener and McGuire, rather than solving the housing crisis, chip away at the pillars of Western Civilization. That’s the crisis.


Susan Kirsch, Livable California, Mill Valley

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