If feds try to ID deportable immigrants using Cal data, state will block access

Since January of 2015, when the state of California began offering immigrants here illegally the opportunity to become lawful drivers, the state Department of Motor Vehicles reports it has issued more than 792,000 licenses to undocumented drivers. Now, however, California is preparing for the possibility that the administration of President-elect Trump—who campaigned on a promise to deport at least 2 million people—might demand access to various state databases that would reveal the names and locations of undocumented immigrants, such as the one maintained by the DMV.

But in a state where Democrats hold the governor’s office and supermajorities in both houses of the Legislature, lawmakers say if the Trump administration does come knocking for such state data, their answer will be a vociferous “no.” That would likely kick off what could be a protracted fed-versus-state legal battle—one in which people on both sides predict their argument would prevail.

“We’re consulting with our lawyers to make sure (data) is not accessible to federal authorities for any deportation proceedings,” said Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de León (D-Los Angeles). Read the full CALmatters story:

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