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Global Climate Action Summit

California’s green-minded Gov. Jerry Brown recently presided over a summit on climate change in San Francisco, where hundreds of regional officials from around the world gathered for a marathon brainstorming session.

It was a fitting venue: California has long been a leader in the fight against global warming, with statewide standards for reducing greenhouse gases and for increasing the use of clean energy. CALmatters, which reported on the conference, has extensively explored California’s response to climate change and many related issues as part of our environmental coverage.

The conference featured promises to reduce greenhouse gases, vows to banish carbon, multilateral pacts and sincere handshakes.

California pledges to reduce transportation emissions, one in five elderly Californians lives in poverty and political pundits predict a blue wave in California.

The state wants 5 million clean vehicles on the road by 2030. There's a long way to go.

FDA's crackdown on e-cigarettes, Global Climate Action Summit opens in SF, Cole Harris' website is hacked by an insider and don't hold your breath for a third party

California has been a leader in developing climate policy, yes, but there have been missteps, and there’s more work to do.

Global Climate Action Summit opens in SF, Gov. Jerry Brown considers licenses for ex-felons, local governments make moves on rent control and school chief candidates split over school start times.

The governor holds a summit of regional leaders from around the world who've pledged to reduce greenhouse gases. Businesses are coming, too.

Some environmental activists say Brown should ban fracking, end new oil drilling and wean the state off fossil fuels.

As California lawmakers addressed epic wildfires this week, there was an inescapable subtext: Climate change will be staggeringly expensive, and we'll all pay for it.

California’s landmark climate law came with promises of economic benefit. But experts say it’s virtually impossible to tell if those promises are coming true.

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