In summary

On this episode of “Gimme Shelter” CalMatters’ Matt Levin and the Los Angeles Times’ Liam Dillon discuss President Trump’s ominous tweets about low-income housing and the suburbs.

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After dismantling an Obama-era housing regulation intended to desegregate American neighborhoods, President Donald Trump tweeted an ominous warning to suburbanites: If presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden becomes president, he will “destroy your neighborhood and American dream.”

A few days later, Trump elaborated on what he meant in another tweet: “I am happy to inform all of the people living their Suburban Lifestyle Dream that you will no longer be bothered or financially hurt by having low income housing built in your neighborhood…”

On this episode of “Gimme Shelter: The California Housing Crisis Podcast,” CalMatters’ housing and data reporter Matt Levin and the Los Angeles Times’ Liam Dillon discuss the discriminatory history of how the federal government collaborated with private industry after World War II to exclude people of color from mostly white suburbs, and how that history is directly connected 21st century suburban fears of low income housing. They interview Karyn Lacy, a sociologist with the University of Michigan, on how the suburbs have changed in the past two decades and whether Trump’s message will resonate.

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Matt Levin is the data and housing dude for CalMatters. His work entails distilling complex policy topics into easily digestible charts and graphs, finding and writing original stories from data, yelling...