In summary

You don’t save endangered species by killing them, and African communities see little benefit from hunting.

By Michelle Kretzer, Norfolk, Va.

Michelle Kretzer is a senior writer with the PETA Foundation, covering hunting issues and wildlife.

Re: “Ban on hunting trophies risks funding for healthy African ecosystems”; Commentary, Aug. 27, 2020

Trophy hunters would love for us to believe they have some charitable motive, but you don’t save endangered species by killing them, and African communities see little benefit from hunting.

The report cited by the author has been criticized for being based on information supplied by hunting associations and unpublished literature that can’t be fact-checked. 

A large, non-hunting-affiliated study by Economists at Large found that, “Nature based tourism does play a significant role in national development, but trophy hunting is insignificant. Across the investigated countries, trophy hunting revenue was only 1.8% of tourism revenues.” Most of that stays with expensive hunting outfits – often based outside Africa – and corrupt politicians.

Tours allowing visitors to observe animals in their natural habitats can provide significant funding to preserve forests, create jobs and truly protect iconic species. 

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