Gimme Shelter Podcast: Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg


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State legislators are trying to revive redevelopment, the controversial “urban renewal” program that provided a major source of affordable housing funding before its elimination seven years ago. Matt and Liam explore how redevelopment worked and didn’t work, and what redevelopment 2.0 might look like. First, an Avocado of the Fortnight is awarded to Beverly Hills for meeting its affordable housing requirement–all three units of it (4:45). Then an explanation of what redevelopment was and why it went away (12:00), as well as what political waters legislators will have to navigate to revive the program (22:00). Finally, an interview with Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg on his role as state senate leader during redevelopment’s demise (28:30) and broader housing issues confronting Sacramento (homelessness, rent control, Bay Area rent refugees).

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