In summary

On this episode of “Gimme Shelter: The California Housing Crisis Podcast,” CalMatters’ Matt Levin and the Los Angeles Times’ Liam Dillon interview Andre Perry, researcher at the Brookings Institute, on how black property is devalued throughout the country and in California.

The key to wealth accumulation for most U.S. households is owning a home. That’s especially true in California, where skyrocketing home values have transformed homes in formerly middle-class neighborhoods into million-dollar nest eggs. 

But those equity gains have come at different rates for black Californians. Homes in majority black neighborhoods across the country are undervalued compared to equivalent homes in neighborhoods with few black residents, controlling for factors like the quality of the local school district and access to neighborhood amenities like parks.

In the San Francisco Bay Area, that means homes in majority black neighborhoods are undervalued by roughly $164,000

On this episode of “Gimme Shelter: The California Housing Crisis Podcast,” CalMatters’ Matt Levin and the Los Angeles Times’ Liam Dillon interview Andre Perry, researcher at the Brookings Institute, on how black property is devalued throughout the country and in California.

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Matt Levin is the data and housing dude for CalMatters. His work entails distilling complex policy topics into easily digestible charts and graphs, finding and writing original stories from data, yelling...