Californians are voting on 12 propositions, but not all are funded equally. Just take a look at that fat slab of lilac in the graphic below.

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No surprise for even the most dimly engaged Californians who have been bombarded with ads for weeks now: Funding for Proposition 22, a measure to exempt gig-economy companies from a new state labor law, dwarfs just about everything else. To date, its yes campaign has raised nearly $188 million. That’s $3 of every $10 that’s been spent for or against any proposition on the November 2020 ballot. 

Now click that lilac band to zoom in. You’ll see that the majority of that funding is coming from three companies: Uber, Lyft and Doordash. The bulk of opposition funding comes from unions such as the United Food & Commercial Workers and the Service Employees International Union. 

Other big-money battles:

And if you don’t see Propositions 17 and 18, look closer — they’re there, as slivers. Evidently no deep-pocketed interests want to fight over voting rights for parolees and 17-year-olds.

Via the Post It, CalMatters political reporter Ben Christopher shares frequent updates from the (socially distanced) 2020 campaign trail.


Californians — what to know before you vote

In addition to the high-stakes Trump vs. Biden presidential match, the 2020 ballot asks you whether to raise property taxes, expand rent control, ban cash bail, further protect consumer data privacy and resurrect affirmative action. It also will determine if the state Legislature remains in the control of a gigamajority of Democrats, and if the “blue wave” that swept away half of GOP-held congressional seats has receded. Confused about anything? Our best-on-the-market voter guide has got you covered.


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Ben Christopher

Ben covers California politics and elections. Prior to that, he was a contributing writer for CalMatters reporting on the state's economy and budget. Based out of the San Francisco Bay Area, he has written...