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State Assembly

Hot Races

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The primary election for the California Assembly will take place on June 7, 2022. Voters in each of the 80 districts will elect one Assemblymember to represent them.

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District 12

The district

From the Golden Gate to the City of Santa Rosa, this district includes the entirety of Marin County with a sliver of southern Sonoma thrown in for good measure. Few districts are as reliably Democratic. But given the local blend of hyper-affluent enclaves, aging hippy homeowners, dairy ranchers and highly segregated working class cities, Democrats come in different flavors.

Voter registration: 59.3% Democratic, 14.8% Republican, 20.0% no party preference

The scoop

When Assemblymember Marc Levine announced his bid for state Insurance Commissioner, he left an empty seat in one of the bluest corners of the state. Four local politicos rushed in to fill the void.

Sara Aminzadeh, a lawyer and clean water advocate who sits on the state’s coastal commission, is new to the district (she lives in uber tony Kentfield) but managed to rack up the most high-profile endorsements and, so far, the most money. That probably came as a shock to Marin County Supervisor Damon Connolly, whose resume runs long on local elected experience and who has closer ties to the state party’s traditional power base — organized labor. If that dynamic sounds familiar, it’s reminiscent of the 2012 election, when Levine upset the party-backed favorite, putting him on the outs with the state’s Democratic establishment. So far Aminzadeh is doing her best not to ruffle those feathers by touting her friendship with the Assembly speaker

Ida Times-Green — a social worker, the board president of the Sausalito-Marin City School District and the only Black candidate in the race — has made education, racial justice and single-payer health care her top issues, but has so far scrambled to catch up with Aminzadeh and Connolly. Ditto for Steve Schwartz, an organic farmer who sits on the Gravenstein Union school board and is the only one who hails from the district’s sometimes overlooked Sonoma County section. 

Note from H.R.: In 2019, Connolly pleaded guilty to a drunk driving charge after he crashed into a stop sign and then left the scene.

Applicants

  • Democratic
  • Republican
  • American Independent
  • Green
  • Libertarian
  • Peace & Freedom
  • No Party
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Key Endorsements

Sara Aminzadeh

  • Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis
  • Sen. Scott Wiener
  • California Nurses Association
  • California Environmental Voters

Damon Connolly

  • California Teachers Association
  • Former California Democratic Party chairman John Burton
  • State Sen. Dave Cortese

District 20

The district

South of Oakland and North of Fremont, this district gathers up the working- and middle-class towns of Hayward, San Leandro and Castro Valley before bounding over the hills and grabbing a small chunk of Dublin. Home to some of the Bay Area’s largest immigrant communities, this is the third most ethnically diverse district in the state.

Voter registration: 56.7% Democratic, 13.2% Republican, 25.3% no party preference

The scoop

It came as a surprise to many a California politics watcher when Assemblymember Bill Quirk announced he wouldn’t be seeking reelection. Liz Ortega stepped up to take his place. Leader of the Alameda Labor Council, an umbrella group for more than 100 Bay Area unions, she has plenty of ready-made connections within the mainstream of the California Democratic Party. Hence her endorsement by Quirk, along with a phalanx of other union-friendly heavyweights.

Jennifer Esteen is also a product of labor, albeit of the more anti-establishment variety. Case in point: The registered psychiatric nurse turned union organizer announced her candidacy when Quirk was still planning his 2022 reelection campaign. Esteen, who is Black, Jewish and gay, also has the backing of the Bernie Sanders-aligned Working Families Party

Shawn Kumagai, a Dublin city councilmember and a gay Navy vet, is the only candidate with elected experience. The son of Japanese immigrants, he’s also the only Asian candidate in this district where Asian Americans make up the largest ethnic group. He enjoys a degree of cross-ideological cred as someone who works in one of the region’s more conservative towns and has endorsements from both progressive and moderate legislators.

Only the top two candidates will proceed to the November ballot. With Joseph Grcar running as the lone Republican, it’s possible only one Democrat will make the cut.

Applicants

  • Democratic
  • Republican
  • American Independent
  • Green
  • Libertarian
  • Peace & Freedom
  • No Party
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Key Endorsements

Jennifer Esteen

  • California Working Families Party
  • Black Lives Matter co-founder Alicia Garza
  • SEIU California
  • Equality California

Shawn Kumagai

  • Equality California
  • California YIMBY

Liz Ortega

  • Attorney General Rob Bonta
  • Incoming California Labor Federation leader Lorena Gonzalez
  • California Teachers Association

District 21

The district

Hugging the bay side of the San Francisco peninsula, these are the northern reaches of Silicon Valley — a mix of high-tech industry that hugs U.S. 101 and, sprinkled throughout the hills, some of California’s wealthiest enclaves. 

Voter registration: 55.4% Democratic, 14.4% Republican, 25.1% no party preference

The scoop

This is the last open seat in a lengthy game of musical chairs. First, longtime local Rep. Jackie Speier announced she would be retiring from Congress. That prompted second-ranking Democratic Assemblymember Kevin Mullin to launch his campaign to take her spot. With Mullin’s seat available, seven candidates rushed into what is likely to be one of the state’s more unpredictable primary elections.

Vying for first place on the ballot are Redwood City Mayor Giselle Hale and San Mateo Councilmember Diane Papan. Both come with local elected experience and relatively middle-of-the-pack Democratic policy priorities, though Papan draws more support from the Legislature’s moderate wing. If there’s one major policy distinction between the two, it’s on housing. Hale is a self-described “YIMBY,” which has earned her support from the chairpersons of the Legislature’s two housing committees. In Papan, daughter of the Assembly’s longtime “enforcer” Lou Papan, has been a defender of local governments’ authority over land use decisions, though she also supports more state funding for affordable housing. 

Democratic Socialist James Coleman, the 22-year-old South San Francisco councilmember, is hoping to take the two frontrunners by surprise. That strategy worked for nearby Assemblymember Alex Lee, another lefty Gen-Z-er who won his Milpitas seat with a fraction of the vote in a crowded field. Coleman has a history of upsets, having defeated an 18-year-incumbent for his current job.

Applicants

  • Democratic
  • Republican
  • American Independent
  • Green
  • Libertarian
  • Peace & Freedom
  • No Party
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Key Endorsements

James Hsuchen Coleman

  • Assemblymember Alex Lee
  • California Working Families Party

Giselle Hale

  • Assemblymember Buffy Wicks
  • California Teachers Association
  • U.S. Rep. Anna Eshoo

District 22

The district

A band of Central Valley running from the Diablo Range to the Sierra Foothills, this district is anchored around Modesto, pulling in the many ag towns and commuter exurbs that lie to the south. It’s also one of the state’s true swing Assembly districts. 

Voter registration: 40.4% Democratic, 32.9% Republican, 19.3% no party preference

The scoop

When the Citizens Redistricting Commission redrew California’s electoral maps, it didn’t include an incumbent in this district. That’s created a rare, wide open seat where both Democrats and Republicans have a real shot at victory. 

You’d think that would translate into a ferociously competitive race, but so far this has been a pretty sleepy affair. On the Democratic side, Jess Self — a public defender, a LGBTQ rights advocate and a regular in Stanislaus County Democratic Party circles — easily secured the endorsement of local partisans. No such luck for Democrat Chad Condit, a member of the Ceres-based Condit political dynasty, but he’s hoping to use that to his advantage by running as a moderate who can appeal to independents and Republicans.

A more dramatic political fissure bisects the Republican camp, where deputy sheriff Juan Alanis and Joel Campos are competing for the right-of-center vote. No surprise, Alanis is leaning heavily on his career in law enforcement and drawing endorsements from local electeds. But Campos, a regional planner and National Guard vet, was able to secure the backing of the state party building off his unsuccessful bid for Assembly in 2020.

Applicants

  • Democratic
  • Republican
  • American Independent
  • Green
  • Libertarian
  • Peace & Freedom
  • No Party
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Key Endorsements

Juan Alanis

  • Stanislaus County Deputy Sheriffs’ Association

Joel Campos

  • California Republican Party

Chad Condit

  • Former Gov. Gray Davis
  • Former Los Angeles mayor Antonio Villaraigosa

Jessica Self

  • California Democratic Party
  • Equality California

District 24

The district

Fremont and San Jose may be best understood in the public imagination as the land of Tesla and tech headquarters, but this district is also home to more Asian and Pacific Islanders than any other in the state. 

Voter registration: 49.5% Democratic, 15.2% Republican, 31.4% no party preference

The scoop

Alex Lee shocked the California political world in 2020. After South Bay Assemblymember Kansen Chu decided to leave the Legislature in pursuit of a seat on the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, a cluster of candidates ran to take his place. Lee, a former legislative staffer in his mid-20s and a Democratic Socialist, only cobbled together 15% of the vote. But in the crowded and fractured field, that was enough to put him into the top two against the lone Republican Bob Brunton. In such a solidly Democratic district, that ensured Lee’s ultimate victory. Since coming to Sacramento, he’s established himself as a vocal advocate from the left who isn’t afraid to tick off his more middle-of-the-road colleagues

And what about Chu? He lost his bid for supervisor. Now, he wants his old seat back and he’s drawing on his deep network of allies in the South Bay local government and business community who aren’t sold on the young lefty incumbent. For that vote, Chu will be competing with both Teresa Keng and Lan Diep. A Fremont city council member and restaurant owner, Keng was an enthusiastic backer of Andrew Yang’s presidential campaign in 2020. Diep is a former San Jose city councilmember with a penchant for Hollywood-inspired political antics who only recently joined the Democratic Party.

If recent history repeats itself, only one of the four Democrats running will make the cut alongside the lone Republican, Brunton. Between now and June 7, all of them will be campaigning accordingly. 

Applicants

  • Democratic
  • Republican
  • American Independent
  • Green
  • Libertarian
  • Peace & Freedom
  • No Party
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Key Endorsements

Kansen Chu

  • Newark mayor Alan Nagy
  • Former state Senate leader Kevin de Leon
  • Milpitas Mayor Rich Tran

Teresa Keng

  • Former presidential candidate Andrew Yang
  • Cupertino Mayor Darcy Paul

Alex Lee

  • U.S. Sen. Alex Padilla
  • Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon
  • California Nurses Association
  • SEIU California

Lan Diep

District 27

The district

Bracketed by the I-5 to the west and Highway 99 to the east, this is a majority Latino district with most of its voters split between Merced, Madera and northwest Fresno, its industry dominated by agriculture and oil and its politics leaning Democratic.

Voter registration: 43.2% Democratic, 27.2% Republican, 22.6% no party preference

The scoop

With Assemblymember Adam Gray running for Congress, the Legislature is losing one of its most reliably business-friendly Democrats. 

Mike Karbassi and Esmeralda Soria — both Democrats and both on the Fresno city council — are hoping to take Gray’s place, but are offering starkly different visions of the district’s future. Karbassi, a fiscal conservative, describes himself as a “Blue dog” in the mold of Gray. Soria ran unsuccessfully as a progressive alternative to one of the original blue dogs, U.S. Rep. Jim Costa in 2020. This time around she’s taking a more ecumenical tone, which has earned her the support of unions, progressive groups and moderates alike.

Though two Republicans are running, only one has much of a campaign apparatus. Mark Pazin, former Merced County Sheriff, is running as a staunch conservative “taking the fight to Sacramento liberals.” But as a Jerry Brown appointee to the Office of Emergency Services who served under Gov. Newsom, he does have some experience working with Sacramento liberals, too.

Applicants

  • Democratic
  • Republican
  • American Independent
  • Green
  • Libertarian
  • Peace & Freedom
  • No Party
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Key Endorsements

Mike Karbassi

  • Sen. Melissa Hurtado
  • Fresno Police Officers Association

Esmeralda Soria

  • California Democratic Party
  • Assemblymember Blanca Rubio
  • SEIU California

District 30

The district

Of all the new districts conceived by California’s redistricting commission, this is definitely one of the weirder ones. Stretching 165 miles from the northern shore of Monterey Bay to the outskirts of Santa Maria, this takes in the entirety of the Central Coast in one cartographic bite. That makes for an eclectic mix of California: affluent cliff dwellers of Big Sur, sleepy beach town denizens around Morro Bay, the college kids of San Luis Obipso and, further inland, ranchers, farmers and winegrowers.

Voter registration: 45.5% Democratic, 27.1% Republican, 20.3% no party preference

The scoop

Republican Assemblymember Jordan Cunningham always had a habit of beating the electoral odds, winning where Democratic voters outnumbered Republicans and Donald Trump lost by double digits. But after the district was redrawn to include more of the state’s blue coast, that persuaded Cunningham not to run again.

That opened the door to his 2020 challenger, Morro Bay council member and former teacher Dawn Addis, who secured the endorsement of the state party along with those of some of the biggest left-leaning interest groups. But some Democrats are looking for something different. For the more housing-minded, that’s Jon Wizard, a Seaside city councilmember and policy director with a “Yes In My Backyard” advocacy group. For more business-friendly Dems, the alternative is Zoe Carter of the Monterey County Business Council. 

And though the district leans heavily Democratic, three Democrats in the running could easily split the left-of-center vote, leaving the second spot on the general election ballot to Republican Vicki Nohrden, a twice unsuccessful candidate and co-founder of Wind and Fire Ministries.

Applicants

  • Democratic
  • Republican
  • American Independent
  • Green
  • Libertarian
  • Peace & Freedom
  • No Party
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Key Endorsements

Dawn Addis

  • California Democratic Party
  • California Nurses Association
  • Democratic Legislative Women’s Caucus

Zöe Carter

  • Assemblymember Adam Gray
  •  Assemblymember Carlos Villapudua

Vicki Nohrden

  • California Republican Party

Jon Wizard

  • Assemblymember Buffy Wicks
  • Assemblymember Alex Lee

District 34

The district

From the San Andreas Fault to the Nevada border, this district takes in the entirety of California’s high desert — almost. Portions of Palmdale, Lancaster and Victorville — the region’s most multiethnic and Los Angeles-connected towns — were placed into their own Latino-majority district, leaving this one more rural and more conservative. 

Voter registration: 31.4% Democratic, 39.4% Republican, 20.2% no party preference

The scoop

The problem with having an independent redistricting commission is that sometimes it really does behave independently. Just ask Republican Assemblymembers Tom Lackey and Thurston “Smitty” Smith, both living in this new high desert district. Neither moved, so GOP-leaning voters will have to pick their preferred incumbent. 

Lackey, a former highway patrolman, has been in the Assembly since 2014 and has developed a reputation as a true moderate, in line with his L.A. County-centered district. Smith is newer to the Capitol and a surer conservative vote.

The big question is whether both incumbents, who dominate the field in terms of name recognition and fundraising, will secure the top two spots and make it to November. Democrats make up a sizable minority of the district’s voters, so if all left-of-center voters rally behind the party’s endorsed candidate, Rita Ramirez Dean, it isn’t likely both Lackey and Smith will survive the primary. But Ramirez has her own flaws: She has run unsuccessfully for state or federal office at least nine times and after recently winning a seat on the Victorville city council, she was kicked off after a majority of her colleagues deemed that she didn’t actually live there.

Applicants

  • Democratic
  • Republican
  • American Independent
  • Green
  • Libertarian
  • Peace & Freedom
  • No Party
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Key Endorsements

Rita Ramirez Dean

  • California Democratic Party

Tom Lackey

  • Rep. Kevin McCarthy
  • California Association of Highway Patrolmen

Thurston ‘Smitty’ Smith

  • Rep. Jay Obernolte
  • Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association

District 39

The district

This majority-Democrat district covers the northeastern parts of Los Angeles County, including Palmdale, plus cities in San Bernardino County, including Hesperia and Lancaster. The majority of voters here are Latino making the district a blue cutout from the otherwise conservative-leaning high desert.

Voter registration: Democratic 47.3%, Republican 21.7%, no party preference 22.1%

The scoop

No incumbent resides in this district, which means it’s an open seat. Democrat Andrea Rosenthal, who previously worked as political director for former Assemblymember Christy Smith, moved to this district to run, and earned the state party’s endorsement. She faces fellow Democrats Juan Carillo, a city council member from Palmdale running on his local cred with the backing of many of the state Assembly’s Latino members, and former Assemblymember Steve Fox. A Republican-turned-Democrat who has a strained relationship with the state’s Democratic establishment, Fox lost in 2016 after two lawsuits filed by former staffers, who alleged sexual harassment, being made to work without pay and a hostile work environment. 

The lone Republican in the race is Paul Andre Marsh, a veteran and community liaison.

Applicants

  • Democratic
  • Republican
  • American Independent
  • Green
  • Libertarian
  • Peace & Freedom
  • No Party
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Key Endorsements

Juan Carrillo

  • California Latino Legislative Caucus
  • State Sen. Anna Caballero

Steve G. Fox

  • Assemblymember Jose Medina
  • Past president of League of United Latin American Citizens
  • Oscar Mejia

Andrea Rosenthal

  • State Treasurer Fiona Ma
  • California Labor Federation
  • California Nurses Association
  • California Environmental Voters
  •  California Federation of Teachers
  • SEIU California State Council

District 40

The district

Anchored around the former Republican stronghold of Santa Clarita, this district reaches down across the Santa Susana Mountains into the north San Fernando Valley.

Voter registration: Democratic 41.8%, Republican 29.0%, no party preference 22.7%

The scoop

Assemblymember Suzette Valladeres, a Republican, is perhaps the top electoral target of the California Democratic Party. Even without redistricting, she would have been in for a big political fight, having won her seat in 2020 after a legion of little-known Democrats divided up the center-left vote. That left Valladares and another Republican vying to represent a district where Democrats outnumber GOP voters. With the new electoral map, her district is even bluer. No surprise, in the Legislature, she has voted as one of the most moderate Republican members. 

Which Democrat will be the one to take her on? Two, from opposite wings of the party, have risen to the challenge. Pilar Schiavo, who campaigned for California to adopt a single-payer health insurance system as a labor organizer, received the state party’s endorsement, along with the backing of some of the state’s most progressive elected officials. Annie Cho, a South Korean immigrant who runs a public relations firm and finished third in the 2020 primary, is running under the banner of “responsible reform.” She has the backing of some the Legislature’s more moderate members, along with some of the bigger names in Los Angeles city politics.

Applicants

  • Democratic
  • Republican
  • American Independent
  • Green
  • Libertarian
  • Peace & Freedom
  • No Party
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Key Endorsements

Annie E. Cho

  • Former state Treasurer John Chiang
  • former state Treasurer and Attorney General Bill Lockyer
  •  California Asian Pacific Islander Legislative Caucus
  • Los Angeles County Supervisor Janice Hahn

Pilar Schiavo

  • State Treasurer Fiona Ma
  • AFSCME California
  • California Faculty Association
  • Insurance Commissioner Ricardo Lara
  • California Federation of Teachers
  • California Nurses Association

Suzette Martinez Valladares

  • Los Angeles City Council member John Lee
  • Los Angeles County Supervisor Kathryn Barger

District 70

The district

A landlocked block of north Orange County that extends from the Los Angeles County line over to Garden Grove and down to Fountain Valley, the political and cultural heart of the district is the patchwork of neighborhoods that make up Little Saigon.

Voter registration: Democratic 36.9%, Republican 33.0%, no party preference 24.6%

The scoop

With Republican incumbent Janet Nguyen drawn out of the district and once again running for the state Senate instead, six candidates are now competing to take her place.

This district was drawn to ensure that the state’s largest single Vietnamese community would be empowered to elect a candidate of its choice. Sure enough, four of the most prominent candidates are Vietnamese-American.

On the Republican side that’s both Westminster Mayor Tri Ta, among the first Vietnamese-Americans to serve as mayor of an American city, and City Council member Kimberly Ho, whose political rivalry with one another borders on the personal. Fountain Valley City Council member Ted Bui is also running as a conservative, with the support of numerous GOP state legislators.

While the Republicans clash for a place on the November ballot, Democrats have rallied around a single candidate: Garden Grove City Councilmember Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen, who lost to Janet Nguyen in 2020.

Applicants

  • Democratic
  • Republican
  • American Independent
  • Green
  • Libertarian
  • Peace & Freedom
  • No Party
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Key Endorsements

Ted Bui

  • Senate Republican Leader Scott Wilk
  • Assemblymember Kelly Seyarto
  • Sen. Pat Bates
  • Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association PAC

Kimberly Ho

  • Vietnamese American Federation of Southern California
  • Westminster Police Officers’ Association

Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen

  • Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon
  • Long Beach Mayor Robert Garcia
  • Asian American and Pacific Islander Legislative Caucus
  • Orange County Labor Federation

Tri Ta

  • Former Assemblymembers Travis Allen and Van Tran
  • Fountain City Council member Michael Vo

District 76

The district

Following Interstate 15 north of San Diego and into the affluent hills and canyons of North County, this is traditionally Republican territory that, like many well-to-do suburbs, veered away from the GOP during the Trump years.Voter registration: Democratic, 37.0%, Republican 30.9%, no party preference 25.7%

The scoop

Democrat Brian Maienschein won his north San Diego seat easily in 2020. While Democrats still have an advantage in the redrawn district, it’s a much narrower one, which could spell trouble for the incumbent, who switched from the Republican to Democratic Party in 2019.

The two Republican candidates hoping to unseat Maienschein are attorney June Cutter and local water board representative Kristie Bruce-Lane, who offer distinct types of GOP politics. Cutter, a lawyer and part-time organizer (as in, she declutters peoples’ homes), ran against Maienschein in 2020 and has the backing of most Republican legislators. So far she’s eschewed red-hot culture war issues in favor of more traditional GOP talking points on taxes and crime. Bruce-Lane is running on her experience as an elected water board member in Encinitas, but also on topics more likely to rally the conservative base, including opposition to “critical race theory” and vaccine mandates.

Applicants

  • Democratic
  • Republican
  • American Independent
  • Green
  • Libertarian
  • Peace & Freedom
  • No Party
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Key Endorsements

Kristie Bruce-Lane

  • U.S. Rep. Darrell Issa
  • Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association PAC
  • Ward Connerly
  • State Sen. Brian Jones
  • San Diego Asian Americans For Equality
  • Carl DeMaio

June Cutter

  • U.S. Reps. Young Kim and Michelle Steel
  • Senate Republican Leader Scott Wilk
  • Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association PAC
  • Assembly Republican Leader James Gallagher
  • Former state GOP Chairperson Ron Nehring

Brian Maienschein

  • California Democratic Party
  • Equality California

District 80

The district

From Barrio Logan south of San Diego’s downtown, this district encircles all of National City and Chula Vista before stopping at the U.S.-Mexico border. The most working class and ethnically diverse part of San Diego County, this majority Latino district is solidly Democratic turf. Voter registration: Democratic, 47.0%, Republican 20.1%, no party preference 26.8%

The scoop

Wait, didn’t voters just have this election? Well, sort of. 

After progressive powerhouse Lorena Gonzalez made an early exit from the state Assembly, two Democrats rose to take her place. Former San Diego city council president Georgette Gómez is a lefty in Gonzalez’s mold. A stalwart ally of organized labor, she backs a universal state-run health insurance plan, a “Green New Deal” and the end of cash bail. David Alvarez, who shared time on the city council with Gómez, is no conservative. He had the backing of organized labor when he unsuccessfully ran for mayor in 2014. But he’s moved more to the middle in this election, emphasizing his support for more police funding and his criticisms of Gov. Gavin Newsom’s handling of the pandemic and homelessness.

On April 5, Gómez narrowly edged Alvarez in the primary election to serve out the remainder of Gonzalez’s term. They’ll go head-to-head again on June 7 in the runoff. But here’s the catch: That’s the same day that voters will be asked to decide which two candidates should proceed to November to win a full two-year term. Both Gómez and Alvarez are running in that election, too.

To make matters even more complicated, the two races — for the remainder of the current term and the entirety of the next one — aren’t in the same exact district. The new map penned by the state’s redistricting commission only applies to the latter. So could one of the two candidates win the short-term job, but lose the race for the full term? It wouldn’t be the first time.

What we do know: While two Republicans are in the running, Gómez and Alvarez are the clear front-runners. And if the April special election is anything to go by, the race is going to serve as a proxy battle between organized labor and other advocacy groups aligned with the party base who want to see Gonzalez replaced with a like-minded progressive, and business interests who would prefer a more moderate flavor of Democrat.

Applicants

  • Democratic
  • Republican
  • American Independent
  • Green
  • Libertarian
  • Peace & Freedom
  • No Party
Loading campaign finance data…

Key Endorsements

David Alvarez

  • San Diego Union Tribune editorial board
  • Former state Sen. Denise Ducheny
  • Southwest Regional Council of Carpenters

Georgette Gómez

  • California Democratic Party
  • California Labor Federation
  • Former Assemblymember Lorena Gonzalez
  • California Nurses Association
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